Articles

AKA – Monuments, Cross My Heart & Energy (Track By Track Review)

In the world of South African hip hop. Kiernan Jarryd Forbes has s cut a path for himself. You may not agree with his social personality and well-documented brashness, but you have to admit he has earned his stripes in the universe of South African music.

in this new post, we bring you three of the “Fela in Versace” rapper’s recent works: “Monuments,” “Cross My Heart,” and “Energy.” a common take from all three is that they are energizing and can be enjoyed with a smoke, in the company of others, or alone.

Monuments (feat. Yanga Chief & Grandmaster Ready D) – Single

AKA

    • Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap
    • Release Date: 2020-05-22
    • Explicitness: explicit
    • Country: ZAF
    • Track Count: 1
  • ℗ 2020 South Africa – Sony Music Entertainment Africa (Pty) Ltd, under exclusive licence

“Monuments” is not exactly a monumental work, but as a piece of history and a testament of being and becoming, it flies. The song traces AKA’s musical odyssey and why he elected to take a walk in the corridors of music.

He ascribed introspection, thinking to himself, as the reason he elected to start making music. A little cash, a mother’s encouragement, and a fake gold chain and the songster was set to conquer the musical.

The revelation of fake gold chain should not elicit mirth, really. This is the reality of most artistes at the outset.

And when they eventually “blow,” they go for the McCoy. AKA has done just that. One may add, as an aside, some artistes remain in the drain, however rich they become later, holding still to the fake.

“Monuments,” which features and Grandmaster Ready D,  swings rapidly from when AKA was an unknown figure, taking the listener to the world of notable figures the rapper admires, from Lebron James to ProKid (until his death, a respected figure in South African hip hop).

Soon enough the listener is taken into the world of AKA’s success as a musician and the realities of it, as well as some social observations by the rapper.

Cross my Heart – Single

AKA

    • Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap
    • Release Date: 2020-05-22
    • Explicitness: explicit
    • Country: ZAF
    • Track Count: 1
  • ℗ 2020 South Africa – Sony Music Entertainment Africa (Pty) Ltd, under exclusive licence

In the other track, “Cross My Hear,” AKA, consumed by the spirit of infatuation – you might sat love – cries out to the lady of his addiction, how he misses her when they are apart.

A cliché sting, “Absence make my heart grow fonder,” diluted much of the power of the first verse. The next verse partly compensates for this, as the songster, still in the heat of his ardour, loudly seeks coital and fiduciary salvation.

He commends the lady for being true – you may say contemptuous of the herd mentality that makes a lady do anything to please her man. She has no qualms – no fears whatsoever – setting him straight when he is lost in his own preenings. For this he is grateful.

His gratitude may has spawned a glutinous intimacy between them such that he is unable to get her out of his mind. She is stuck on his soul like a tattoo, but luminous.

Energy (feat. Gemini Major) – Single

AKA

    • Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap
    • Release Date: 2020-05-22
    • Explicitness: explicit
    • Country: ZAF
    • Track Count: 1
  • ℗ 2020 South Africa – Sony Music Entertainment Africa (Pty) Ltd, under exclusive licence

With “Energy,” a collaborative song with Gemini Major, a respected South African producer, AKA unleashes musical energy that will keep fans warm after a first listen.

This song, which appeared on the SupaMega’s YouTube channel in May, takes the listener, once again, into AKA’s brave new world, a world of artistry and power, symbolized as “top of the mountain.”

What sustains him here and makes him feel like Tony Montana? You may say a robust belief in self and steely resolve under pressure. The SupaMega doesn’t break. He shines instead.

And because he loves doing this his own way – loves being a leader, according to him – some peeps have taken the liberties of calling him arrogant. The rapper doesn’t much care about this, though.

Having worked his way up, do you expect him to look down to be distracted? Your guess is as good as wine. Yes, wine, not mine. Who cares for the house of clichés?

Anusie John

John is a linguistic hedonist whose other pastime, besides writing, is reading up on politics and holding leaders to account. He believes Nigeria can be better and is working behind the scenes to actualize that.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *